U.K. Election

Look Right When Crossing

Bullington select DHT3
Cameron, second from the left standing, part of the Bullingdon club in Oxford. Boris Johnson, the mayor of London, is seated on the far right.
  • Why it matters

    Why it matters

    Britain voted to keep Conservatives in power, hoping that it would lead to stability and economic recovery.

  • Facts

    Facts

    • The Conservative party outperformed expectations in Britain’s election.
    • The Labour party meanwhile delivered its worst set of results since 1987, when Margaret Thatcher won her third victory.
    • The Scottish National Party now dominates Scotland.
  • Audio

    Audio

  • Pdf

Britain has always had a reputation for being traditional. On Friday morning, as the results of the country’s general election rolled in, it appeared to be deserved.

After a bitterly fought election campaign, where polls appeared to point to a hung parliament, the Conservative Party, previously in coalition with the the Liberal Democrats, looked set for an outright victory. With just a handful of seats to declare, the party had won 323 seats in the 650-seat House of Commons, tantalisingly close to a majority. Further declarations and parliamentary quirks meant it was likely to cross the line by the end of the day.

It was a triumph for current Prime Minister David Cameron. He won his seat comfortably. London mayor Boris Johnson, a contemporary of Mr. Cameron at both the incredibly exclusive boarding school Eton, and at Oxford University, who was photographed posing with Mr. Cameron in white tie in tails as a student, did too.

The Labour party meanwhile delivered its worst set of results since 1987, when Margaret Thatcher won her third victory. The Liberal Democrats, who went into coalition with the Conservatives in 2010, were nearly wiped out. They had won 57 seats in the last election. Now they have less than 10.

The strength of the Conservative victory is likely to lead to the resignation of Mr. Cameron’s three biggest rivals: Labour leader Ed Miliband, head of the United Kingdom Independence Party Nigel Farage and Liberal Democrat boss Nick Clegg.

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