MBA market

The Business of Education

HHL
Annemarie Heyl is ready for business.
  • Why it matters

    Why it matters

    German universities are trying to compete with international schools by offering MBAs, though employers value other qualifications too.

  • Facts

    Facts

    • MBAs are still a rarity in German universities and those on offer don’t enjoy the same reputation as courses offered by big universities in the United States or the United Kingdom.
    • A Handelsblatt survey of 30 blue-chip companies in Germany found require a master’s degree, but not necessarily an MBA.
    • A random selection of 1,000 experts at Comtach, an online marketplace for independent consultants, 17 percent had an MBA, with most graduating from German and U.S. universities, followed by schools in the United Kingdom and Switzerland.
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  • Audio

    Audio

  • Pdf

When Annemarie Heyl, the daughter of the owner of a mid-sized business in Germany, decided to seek an MBA, she wanted to find a university in Germany instead of applying abroad.

“What’s the sense of me going to a university in the United States with a great reputation when I’d need to borrow immense amounts of money and I’d have friends that then return home to places all over the world?” Ms. Heyl said. “For me it is very important to build a network at home.”

So she studied at Leipzig’s HHL Graduate School of Management instead. After graduating, Ms. Heyl and two fellow graduates set up their own company making cold-pressed juices, called “Kale and Me,” in Hamburg.

The program she chose is a rarity: German universities don’t usually offer Masters of Business Administration, and those on offer don’t enjoy the same reputation as courses offered by big universities in the United States or the United Kingdom.

But German schools are now in the business of trying to catch up. Their goal: to rise up the international rankings of business education.

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