Organic Food

No Appetite for Investment

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Organic food is consistently on the rise in Germany.
  • Why it matters

    Why it matters

    As Germans turns to healthier food sources, investors see opportunity in Germany’s lucrative organic supermarkets.

  • Facts

    Facts

    • The German government gave the organic farming sector a subsidy of €160.7 million in 2013.
    • Germany now accounts for 30 percent of all sales of organic food within the European Union, according to the German agricultural ministry.
    • German households spent €7.55 billion on organic food and drinks in 2013, which is five times more than in 1997.
  • Audio

    Audio

  • Pdf

A crowd of young, well-dressed women in their thirties huddle in front of a stall with gojiberries and dried apple chunks at one of Germany’s growing number of organic supermarkets. The food on the aisles of the store in Berlin’s middle-class Charlottenburg district is likely to be fairtrade, regionally sourced and expensive.

Germany is still the land of discount supermarkets: Aldi, Lidl and Netto are found in every town, but the demand for organic food is growing. The country now accounts for 30 percent of all sales of organic food within the European Union, according to the German agriculture ministry.

But despite the rapid growth, the sector remains stubbornly resistant to outside investment.

Peter Kaiser who founded Bio Company, one of Berlin’s biggest organic food chains in 1999, told Handelsblatt Global Edition that he wants to expand regionally. But he wants that growth to be natural, with the founders keeping control of the company.  He said he had no intention of opening up  Bio Company to investors via an IPO or a sale of part of the company.

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